INVESTING IN EDUCATION ENTREPRENEURS IN GUATEMALA, INDIA, & KENYA

Currently, Global Education Fund provides multi-year grants and other support to innovative education entrepreneurs and their programs in Kenya, India and Guatemala.

 

THE STATE OF EDUCATION IN KENYA

 

SECONDARY ENROLLMENT

68% - overall

70% Male, 65% Female

LOWER SECONDARY COMPLETION RATES  (~10th Grade)

83.1%

ENROLLMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

4%

 

Global Education Fund supports Kenyan organizations working to develop youth in their country. GEF concentrates on secondary age students living in poverty and effective approaches to developing leadership and other skills essential for these youth to lead productive and independent lives.

The Kenyan government provides free public schooling only up to 8th grade. The government requires families to share the costs at secondary school level which has significant negative consequences for students from poor families. Scholarships help some students but dropout rates for disadvantaged students are high, especially for girls.  According to a 2014 report by a task force on improving the performance of public primary schools, commissioned by Nairobi County’s Governor, Evans Kidero, the transition rate from primary to secondary schools in the city was at an all time low.  Only 50% of pupils completing standard 8th grade proceeded to secondary school due to lack of school fees or insufficient facilities. This is very worrying and has longer term repercussions - whether earlier pregnancies for the girls or lower income earning potential for both boys and girls.

Furthermore, many of those already in school do not acquire the skills needed to gain access to the job market and to become leaders and productive members of their communities. Rote learning is still too often the accepted mode of teaching, where  critical thinking, problem solving and practical skills applicable to sustaining livelihoods is missing. Entrepreneurship skills training, experiential learning and encouraging youth to give back or find ways to improve their local communities are proven, evidence-based methods to meet that need.


OUR INVESTMENT IN KENYA

 

DOLLARS INVESTED

$331,330

STUDENTS REACHED

8,635

THE STATE OF EDUCATION IN INDIA

 
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SECONDARY ENROLLMENT

69% overall

71% male, 66% female

LOWER SECONDARY COMPLETION RATES  (~10th Grade)

80.9%

ENROLLMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

23.9%

 

While India has achieved fast-paced economic growth, this has not yet translated into improved basic educational standards among its 1.2 billion people, particularly for children living in poor and marginalized communities. 93% of Indian children were enrolled in primary school in 2011 – something unimaginable 10 years ago. Yet, many are not learning enough while they are at school. 90% of children from poorer households remain illiterate even after completing four years of schooling, and less than half of children have basic literacy and math skills. Teacher absenteeism is systemic, hampering learning, particularly for the disadvantaged.

Dropout rates are high, especially for girls, Dalits and other marginalized groups. In many poor communities, school fees for tuition, textbooks, uniforms and supplies often force children to drop out of school, as these expenses can easily consume a substantial percentage of a poor family’s income. In addition, 61% of girls in India are married before age 16. Human Rights Watch reports that 64% of adolescent girls drop out before grade 8. Similarly, 51% of Dalit students, traditionally from the lowest castes, drop out before grade 8.

Quality education is lacking and learning standards are low. For those already in school, the education they receive does not prepare them adequately for their eventual transition to later learning and meaningful livelihoods. In many schools, rote learning is emphasized to the exclusion of problem solving, leadership and critical thinking. A 2012 global study of learning standards in 74 countries conducted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) ranked India near the bottom, sounding a wake-up call for the country’s education system.


OUR INVESTMENT IN INDIA

 

DOLLARS INVESTED

$108,060

STUDENTS REACHED

3,240

PARTNERS

GURU-G

STATE OF EDUCATION IN GUATEMALA

 
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SECONDARY ENROLLMENT

65% overall

68% male, 62% female

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LOWER SECONDARY COMPLETION RATES  (~9th Grade)

59.2%

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ENROLLMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

18.3%

 

The current state of the education system is substandard. Many classrooms, especially in rural Guatemala, do not have adequate teaching materials. Additionally, with more than half the population living below the poverty line, many children – especially rural and indigenous children – are forced to drop out of school to help support their families or because they are unable to afford the cost of uniforms, books, supplies and transportation.

 Gender disparity is a key problem and is seen in education statistics. Of the 2 million children in Guatemala that do not attend school, the majority are indigenous girls living in rural areas. In fact, over half of the Guatemalan population is indigenous and less than 30% of poor, rural indigenous girls are enrolled in secondary school. Indigenous girls in Guatemala are among the country’s most disadvantaged group with limited schooling, early marriage, frequent childbearing, and chronic poverty. The need to invest in education, particularly for undeserved girls, is acute.

In many poor communities, school fees for tuition, textbooks, uniforms and supplies easily consume a substantial percentage of a poor family’s income and result in high drop out from school.  Dropout rates are high, especially for girls. Girls particularly are expected to take care of siblings, leave school to help support their family or get married early.  

Furthermore, across Guatemala, particularly in rural schools and in indigenous communities, schools are often poorly funded and lack adequate books, curriculum guides, literacy materials and exam prep guides.  Teachers are not properly trained, particularly in rural schools. Finally, recruiting and retaining quality teachers in rural schools poses a significant challenge.


OUR INVESTMENT IN GUATEMALA

 

DOLLARS INVESTED

$64,380

STUDENTS REACHED

2,400

CURRENT PARTNERS

ADIMTU

Asturias